Search Results for: label/steroids

Steroids, Blood Doping, and Deflated Footballs

Tom Brady

Deflate-Gate: What did Tom Brady know?

If it wasn’t for steroids, blood doping, and deflated footballs – plus a plethora of well-publicized misbehaviors from adultery to drug abuse to gambling – our sports heroes would still be our heroes.

In a distant past and far away galaxy, reporters would protect the reputation of a raging, self-destructive alcoholic like Yankee great, Mickey Mantle. (Those were his own words.)

The 60s and 70s brought a different brand of reporting that was a mix of a more robust and aggressive investigative journalism with a heaping dose of shock appeal. The “shock” part of that mix exploded first with the internet boom and then went from a hydrogen bomb to a nuclear bomb with the eruption of social media. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and a host of others are Barry-Bonds-level steroid injections for the TMZ-reveal-all world we live in.

The latest scandal to rock the world of sports is the revelation that the New England Patriots used under-inflated footballs in the AFC Championship game against the Indianapolis Colts, a game which they won, to reach Super Bowl XLIX in Glendale, Arizona, against the Seattle Seahawks on February 1, 2015. [Read more…]

Contact Page

Snail Mail:

2000 Mallory Lane, Suite 130-229, Franklin, Tennessee 37067

J Mac – 3-point Scoring Machine

Tune into the next edition of ESPN SportsCenter and you’ll probably hear about another athlete arrested for drunk driving or for testing positive for steroids or for getting in trouble at three in the morning for some form of disorderly conduct.

Of course many athletes are outstanding citizens and terrific role models. And some sports stories transcend the category to break down our walls of cynicism. Jason McElwain – J Mac to his teammates – will never play professional basketball but he has become an internet legend not for getting into trouble, but for suiting up in his final game as team manager and catching on fire behind the three-point line.

Truth can be stranger than fiction and right now I’m inspired enough that I might head out to the driveway to work on my own three-point shooting.

Put me in coach!

Holidays Are for Games: 3 Recommendations

The online video gaming industry is huge and getting huger every year – almost as big as Hollywood and on a growth trajectory that will continue to cut into the TV audience for sports. But for all the realism and sophistication found in the new product launches and annual updates, video games lack something important that can still be found in playing old school board games: face-to-face human interaction and intimacy.

It’s almost Christmas. A lot of people will be off work with vacation time and a lot of families and friends will gather to celebrate and catch up. Tis the season when classic board games like Life, Trivial Pursuit, Monopoly. Clue, and Scrabble will be lifted down from top closet shelves and dusted off. Holidays are for games.

Here are three holiday game ideas that you might want to try or adapt with your friends and family members.

Settlers of Catan

Up to 6 can play.

1. Settlers of Catan. My soon to be son-in-law brought this to our family Christmas gathering last year and the award-winning game was an instant hit. Think of Risk on steroids without the cannons and destroyed troops. The board comes in about 30 pieces and can be set up different every time. Up to six can play. The goal is to get 10 ‘victory points’, which are gained by building roads, settlements, cities, and armies. Players have to accumulate wood, bricks, ore, sheep, and grain through strategically building settlements in the right spots – and through good old-fashioned barter with other players. Sounds complicated but it only takes 15 to 30 minutes to learn. There are game extensions in the Catan family that can take you on the ocean or to outer space or into particular historical epochs, like the Roman Empire.

2. Fast Scrabble. I like regular Scrabble just fine but if you want an interesting variation try ‘fast scrabble.’ All tiles are placed in the middle of the table face down. The first player turns over a tile. If it’s a one-letter word like ‘I’ or ‘A’ then the first player to call out the word gets to keep the tile, face up, in front of him or her. If it’s not a word, the tile remains with the person who turned it over as a free letter. The second player turns over a tile and again, whoever calls out a word, made from that letter or that letter and any other letters that are face up, gets all the tiles to make a new word. If ‘A’ came up first and then ‘M’ came up second, player three can call out ‘Am’ and keeps that word in front of him. If the third letter pulled up is ‘C’ then the first player can call ‘Cam’ and all letters come back to him or her. If the next letter is an ‘E’ then someone can yell ‘Came’ and the tiles are now all theirs. Once a word is formed the letters must stay intact and in that order but can switch to different players throughout the game. ‘Oven’ can become ‘Coven’ can become ‘Covens’ and so on. When all tiles have been turned over, each player adds up the points on their tiles that are formed into words and subtracts any letters that are sitting free. Loud. Fast. Fun.

3. Team Hybrid Game Night. One of our favorite activities during the holidays is a family and/or friend game night where we divide into teams and play a combination of popular games, a new one each round. This works best with four or five teams going four to five rounds. We like to use Trivial Pursuit (each team is asked every question on a single card per round and is awarded 10 to 20 points per correct answer), Pictionary (50 points for identifying the picture), Tabu (20 points per correct word), Outburst (10 points per correct word), Scene-It (all teams compete at once in an ‘All Play’), but you can come up with a myriad of other options, like Charades or Family Feud, by adapting your favorite games into the process. One of the nice things about the team approach is that you can enjoy competition but no one gets singled out as not being good at something like Trivial Pursuit. I like to do a final round where points are doubled and each team gets to choose which of the previous games played they want to try.

Whether you’re gearing up to drive to Grandma’s or are hosting a group of friends on Christmas afternoon, don’t get stuck in the rut of staring at the TV screen and missing out on the people around you. Games or no games, find ways to interact face-to-face.

Who Framed Roger Clemens?

Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond to it. So they say. But are they right? There’s undoubtedly enough anecdotal evidence of those who have overcome hardships and tragedies with faith, optimism, and resilience — and conversely, enough examples of those who squandered advantages, blessings, and favor through pessimism, lack of discipline, and feelings of entitlement – to suggest yes, “they” are probably right. To some degree or another.

There’s a parallel theorem that’s back in the news.

Outside of murdering your wife while wearing a new pair of Aris Isotoner Light gloves (if the gloves are too small, don’t wear them at all), your opportunity to rehabilitate a damaged reputation is 10% what you’ve done in the first place and 90% how you own up to it.

Don’t hold me to that exact ratio but if you don’t believe there’s at least some truth to it, just ask Richard Nixon how effective cover ups are when you’ve obviously broken the rules – and get caught. Bill Clinton looked us right in the eyes, wagged a finger in our direction, and declared, “I did not have …” in his attempt to follow in Nixon’s presidential footsteps. Consumed by arguments of the definition of “is,” his presidency was never the same even if he wasn’t removed from office following his impeachment.

Maybe Roger Clemens never took steroids and was amazingly unaware that others around him, including his colleagues and wife, were doing so. But if he did, his legacy will be tarnished more by his theatrical declarations of innocence than anything he did in an era of baseball when it is estimated that at least two-thirds of Major League Baseball was ingesting some kind of performance enhancer. So who framed Roger Clemens? If he’s found guilty … just ask him!

POSTSCRIPT: He was found guilty and his reputation seems to be permanently damaged.